New Parents

Developmental Milestones

Congratulations on the new addition to your family! We are excited to have you and your new baby join our Pediatrics at Whitlock Family. We are here for you as your child grows up through the years, birth through college. We provide comprehensive healthcare in a nurturing environment in order to help maximize your child’s potential.

All of our staff are committed to identifying each child’s God given gift, which we believe, when developed, can lead to a life full of promise and productivity, not only for themselves but the society in which they live.

Our intent is to focus on Preventative Healthcare, discussing ways to optimize your child’s health and thus decrease risks of injuries & illness. We also will partner with you to identify and manage acute/chronic illnesses or injuries that are unavoidable & may impede your child’s ability to do their best if not treated.

Each visit is another building block in our joint goal to maximize your child’s potential before he/she matriculates into society. Things change rapidly when babies are first born so appointments will be more frequent in the beginning and space out as they grow. (See Preventative Care Schedule in “Office Info” section). During each of these visits we will focus on growth, developmental milestones, perform age-appropriate screenings (like vision, hearing, etc.) and a full exam, update vaccines if needed to decrease risks of corresponding illnesses (see “Vaccine” section for details) and educational performance as they get older. Schedule visits in the interim if any illnesses or other concerns develop.

Our website is a great resource and now most insurances have a nurse available for questions 24hrs per day. However, we are always available. If you still have additional questions that need to be answered before the next day, call our main number 770-499-8909 and hold for Answering Service). If it’s a true emergency, call 911 and later when you can, please update us so that we can follow up and make sure everything is okay.

 

Breastfeeding Resources

Breastfeeding Record for Baby’s First Week

Breastfeeding Your Baby (booklet)

Breastfeeding Your Baby: Getting Started

Collecting and Storing Breast Milk

Situations arise where you may need to be separated from your baby; school, work or an evening out. When this occurs, you may wish to pump and store your milk ahead of time. There are a number of different breast pumps available and you will need to find the one that fits your needs.

Breast milk may be stored in the refrigerator for 48 hours. To freeze breast milk, first cool it in the refrigerator, and then put it into the freezer. Frozen breast milk should be used within 3 months if it is stored in the freezer compartment of a refrigerator. Milk stored in a deep freezer is good for 6 months. Remember to label the breast milk with the date that you pumped it. Thaw milk in the refrigerator or in warm water just before feeding. Thawed milk must be used within 24 hours. Note: freezing breastmilk destroys some of its antibodies.

You may introduce a bottle of breast milk or formula at 2-3 weeks of age (2-3 times/week). This is enough to get your baby used to a bottle, but not so much that it will compromise your breast milk supply.

Getting Started

Breastmilk is good for your baby. It is superior to any alternative form of infant formula and is uniquely designed to meet the nutritional needs of your infant. It contains antibodies which will help protect your baby against illness. Breastfeeding is easy, inexpensive, and convenient; there are no bottles to wash and no formula to prepare. Breastmilk is easy to digest, and less allergenic, thus there are fewer problems with constipation and diarrhea. Breastfeeding provides a special bonding for baby and mother. It also helps mom get back into shape by contracting the uterus.

While breastfeeding may be the natural thing to do, it helps to know a little about how to do it. Here are a few steps to help you get started.

  • Wash hands with soap and water.
  • Hold your baby close to your breast and turn your baby so you are tummy to tummy.
  • Hold the breast in your hand and gently stroke the baby’s lips with the nipple until the baby opens wide. Your baby has a “rooting reflex” which will make him turn his mouth toward your touch.
  • Pull the baby onto your breast, helping him to take in as much of the brown area of the nipple as possible.
  • Nurse the baby on both breasts, about 10 minutes per side, burping in between.
  • To remove the baby from the breast, place your finger in the corner of his mouth to break the suction.
  • Proper positioning of the baby on the breast and using different positions to hold your baby while nursing is very important to reduce nipple soreness.

How do I know my baby is getting enough milk?

  • Your baby should have at least 6-8 wet diapers per day and frequent bowel movements. Call us if your newborn is stooling less then 4 times a day in the first two weeks of life.
  • Initially, your baby should nurse 8-14 times over 24 hours (every 1 1/2 to 3 hrs). In the first 2 weeks of life, you should wake your baby for feedings if she sleeps beyond 5 hours.
  • Your breast should feel full before feeding and softer after your baby has nursed.
  • In general, your baby should seem satisfied and content after feeding. If you are concerned, you should call us. We may want to have the baby weighed.

Vitamins and Fluoride

Breastmilk provides the best nutrients for your baby. However, it is likely that your precious jewel will need some additional vitamin D to absorb calcium and phosphorus and also support his/her immune system. If you breastfeed or partially breastfeed your baby, you should give your baby 400 International Units (IU) of Vitamin D by mouth per day. You should also give this supplement if your baby receives less than 32 oz of Vitamin D-fortified formula in a day.

Fluoride provides your child with excellent protection from cavities. Upon the eruption of his/her first tooth, you should subsequently brush the teeth with “half a pea-size” smear of fluoridated toothpaste. You may increase that amount to a “pea-sized” smear at 3 years of age.  At the 6 month well child visit, ask your provider if they recommend that a fluoride varnish be applied to your child’s teeth after they erupt.

If or when you start your young child on supplemental formula, you may use city tap water to mix with the formula for this is already supplemented with fluoride. If you use well water for your drinking water, please check with your county health department* to have your well water tested and then consult with your pediatrician or family physician to assure that your child is getting the right amount of fluoride.

Water

There is enough water in formula and breast milk to meet your baby’s needs, so no extra water is really needed. It may be offered during hot weather or when baby is ill. Once your baby starts eating solid foods, he may require more water.

When a Nursing Mother is Ill and Needs to Take Medications
When a mother becomes ill, she should not interrupt breastfeeding for fear that she may make her baby sick. Breast milk passes immunity to the baby in many circumstances. Frequent hand washing will also decrease the risk of contagiousness.

If you are nursing while ill, it is generally best to avoid most medications. If you wish to take medicine, the following medicines may be taken safely (at the recommended dose) without risk to your baby:

For fever: Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen

For colds: Sudafed; nasal sprays (ex. Afrin, Neosynephrin); Benadryl (Other antihistamines may be given, but there may be a slight decrease in mother’s milk supply)

For pain: Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, codeine, Demerol, Naprosyn

For infection: Antibiotics do not usually produce adverse effects in breast-fed infants.

You may take: Penicillins (eg. Amoxicillin), Ceclor, Cefzil, Lorabid, Suprax, Duricef, Keflex, Augmentin

For weight reduction:

After your child reaches one month of age, you may take products with Aspartame (Nutrasweet) or saccharin. Mothers who carry the gene for phenylketonuria should consult us before taking Aspartame.

If you are taking a medicine which is not listed here, call and speak with our phone nurse.

Milestones/Development Articles

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